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New ideas for Educational Podcasting

Page history last edited by amiddlet50 11 years, 6 months ago
Please share with everyone else the ideas you have, whether they are just ideas or whether they are educational podcasting techniques that you are using.

As you add new ideas please address the following questions:

Title:

Description: (include: who makes it? who for? what happens? how? when? main benefits)

Your name and contact information:

Please note: all contributors will be acknowledged. Everyone involved will be contacted before ideas are published so that they can check and refine their ideas and to agree to their publication.

 

 

 
Title: Audio Case Studies
Case studies for any discipline, possibly in the form of a mini documentary featuring real people or 'actors'. They provide a rich resourse base for various learning and assessment activities. The resource bank is made by academics or student groups.
(Andrew Middleton a.j.middleton AT shu.ac.uk)
 
Title: Advocates
Advocates for various contexts (ie different disciplines) make a proposition to promote discussion or debate. For example, in Information Skills, someone such as an Information Specialist might advocate that, "Wikipedia is dangerous tool" and present an argument to support their assertion. This might generate other audio responses or might be used to seed discussions in online forums or classrooms.
(Andrew Middleton a.j.middleton AT shu.ac.uk)
 
Title: Patient Voices
Health students encounter patient stories through digital media. These stories can form the basis of various follow on activities. Similarly Client Voices would be an approach , possibly using Problem Based Learning methodology, which offers similar learning opportunities. The patient voices (or stories) are collected by academic staff, developers or students.
(Andrew Middleton a.j.middleton AT shu.ac.uk)
 
Title: Diagnostic Cases
Recordings of patients talking about, or being interviewed about, their symptoms. Medical students determine what is wrong. These recordings can be delivered as a podcast or they can be embedded in online assessment exercises. Similarly customer care diagnostic cases around various services could use a similar approach.
(Andrew Middleton a.j.middleton AT shu.ac.uk)
 
Title: Reflective Stories

Students on placement who are not in a position to record their actual experience (i.e. teachers, medics and anyone working whether they would be ethically constrained) are encouraged to create reflective digital stories. These can include abstract significant or real images that complement an aural telling of the experience.

(Andrew Middleton a.j.middleton AT shu.ac.uk)

 

Title: Ping Pong
A serial podcast taking the form of a conversation: one week the students submit work, the next the tutor responds. This exercise could use an Enquiry Based Learning approach over the course of a semester for example. It would support group work or individual work. Different student groups could either compare their ongoing work or could wait until the end to compare strategies. The media activity might be underpinned by other research and teaching activity.
 
Title: Interview pool

Staff and/or students post questions to a podcast feed. These questions could be discipline related or to do with job interviews. Where it is the students posting the questions, there are multiple benefits: by forming questions students immerse themselves more deeply in the topic; students benefit by attempting to answer questions; perhaps further discuss online might discuss the veracity of the questions. Finally, it can be useful for students to articulate questions and present these aloud to encourage confidence in the use of language. 

 

 

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